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Vehicles and the Environment

 

Automobiles have a variety of environmental consequences. Impacts start when a vehicle, like a semi tow truck near me is built (including all of the components and materials that go into the automobile) and finish when it is scrapped at a junkyard (which can recycle many parts but also involves the disposal of many wastes). However, majority of the environmental harm caused by a typical automobile occurs while driving and is strongly linked to fuel usage. Fuel use accounts for roughly 90% of a typical automobile’s lifetime (“cradle to grave”) greenhouse gas output throughout its dozen or so years on the road.

Resource extraction and the manufacture of the raw materials that go into the pieces of an automobile have the greatest environmental effect. For example, iron ore is transformed into steel, which presently makes up the majority of the mass in automobiles. Steel can, of course, be recycled. Today’s autos are around 75% recyclable on average, and utilizing recycled steel reduces energy consumption and emissions. Aluminum (used in various motor parts and wheels, for example) and copper (used for wiring) are two more metals that are frequently recycled. Batteries contain deadly lead and acid, both of which are hazardous. However, if batteries are returned to a fuel station, a parts shop, or a municipal toxic waste site, they may be reused. Plastics are more hard to recycle since they are largely comprised of petroleum. In any event, all of these components cause pollution, much of it owing to the energy usage, air quality, and hazardous material releases that occur during the manufacturing and distribution of vehicles.

Because of pollution in their emissions and pollution related with providing the fuel, most of the ecological impact associated with motor vehicles happens while they are utilized. Nearly all modern autos in the United States run on gasoline; a smaller percentage run on diesel. Alternative fuels are being offered in certain locations, although they are not commonly accessible for most drivers.

 

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